Shattered Dreams

shattered-dreams

Many of us have enjoyed the Book of Ruth and how she and Naomi related to each other. Author Larry Crabb has used this Biblical account as a backdrop to his book, Shattered Dreams. He asks us to think about what we can learn from tragedies and blessings in our own lives.

When we first met Naomi, she was living the pleasant life of the immature, the good life of the untested. Then her world fell apart. Huge dreams were shattered. We met her then as an honest woman, not a visibly good woman, but an emotional realist. She was heartbroken with life and bitter toward God.

Do we have dreams that never worked out how we expected? How did that make us feel? Did it drive us to God or away from God? What do we do with the loss we experience? Larry Crabb covers so many topics in one book, it’s eye-opening for us. His use of Biblical stories in addition to Ruth, Naomi and Boaz brings us to a desire for more. More insight. More truth. More hope.

If you’re seeking God in the middle of shattered dreams, if you’ve become aware of your desire for Him but are having trouble finding Him, be encouraged that it bothers you. The more you’re bothered by not finding Him, the more aware you’re becoming of how badly you want Him.. . .When you realize that your desire for God is the most passionate yearning of your heart, you’re in the spiritual condition to recognize God’s hand when He makes it visible.

Haven’t we all tried building dreams on our own schedule and then wondered what happened when they didn’t work out? Pick up Shattered Dreams in the church library and find out how God wants to bless you now.  

Solid Rock Christian Fellowship, Prescott AZ

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